Patrick M. FOX, Mary FOX, Sylvia C. FOX

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Fox

The Ionia Daily Standard
Saturday, July 25, 1891

P. M. Fox, one of the pioneers of this county, died last evening at his residence in Ionia township at the age of 79 years. The funeral will be from the residence on Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

_________________________________

The Ionia Daily Standard
Wednesday, August 12, 1891

DEPARTED PIONEERS.

Patrick M. Fox, one of the original company of May, 1833, ended his days July 24, 1891.

_________________________________

The Ionia [Weekly] Standard
Friday, April 11, 1890

Mrs. Patrick Fox died at her home north of Muir Thursday morning, after a long and eventful life of 80 years. Mrs. Fox came to Ionia county in 1834, one of a party of the very first white settlers to enter the county.

_________________________________

The Lyons Herald
December 3, 1903

Died at her home in the township of Bloomer, Montcalm county, on Friday, November 27, after a lingering sickness of several months, Miss Sylvia Fox, a former resident of Ionia township. Funeral services were held at the house on Sunday morning, conducted by Rev. Mr. Owen of the M. E. church of Carson City and the remains were brought to the North Plains cemetery and laid beside her father and mother Mr. and Mrs. P. M. Fox. Miss Fox was born in Herkimer Co., N. Y., sixty years ago. She lived in Ionia township for about thirty years and two years ago moved to Bloomer. All that kind hands and a skillful physician could do to alleviate her suffering was done but of no avail.

_________________________________

Carson City Gazette
December 4, 1903

Miss Sylvia C. Fox died at her home at Bloomer Center Friday, Nov. 27, aged 60 years, 4 months and 24 days. Funeral services were held at the house Sunday and burial was made in North Plain Cemetery. Rev. D. J. Owens officiating. Miss Fox had been ill several months and was a great sufferer.

 


Mrs. W. B. LINCOLN

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Lincoln, Barnes

The Ionia Daily Standard
Saturday, April 8, 1893

A Good Woman Gone.

Mrs. Dr. W. B. Lincoln, whose illness was heretofore announced in these columns, died at Muskegon yesterday. Her daughter, Mrs. Dr. H. B. Barnes, and Dr. Barnes, were with the deceased during her brief illness, and at the time of her death. The remains arrived in Ionia this afternoon, and the funeral will probably be on Monday.

Few women were better known in the county than Mrs. Lincoln. Coming to Ionia among the very earliest of the pioneers--away back in 1833, we think--in company with her late husband; she had been long and closely identified with the county's history and growth. Her whole nature was one full of sunshine, and her mission appeared to be only to do good. Truly, a good woman has gone to her reward.

 


Dr. William B. LINCOLN

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Lincoln, Arnold, Eastman, Barnes, Nelles

The Ionia [Weekly] Standard
Friday, June 16, 1882

DEATH OF DR. LINCOLN.

Dr. William B. Lincoln died at his home in this city last Monday morning at 1 o'clock, in the 75th year of his age. He had been ill for some time, and his death was not unexpected. Funeral took place from the house on Wednesday, at 10 o'clock a. m.
_____

Dr. Lincoln was born in Peru, Bennington county, Vermont, December 29, 1807. He was one of nine children and his father was a farmer. When a young man he taught school in the winter and worked on his father's farm in the summer. He studied medicine in the office of Dr. Abraham Lowell, of Chester, Vermont, and at the age of 25 graduated from the clinical school of medicine in Chester, Vt. In the spring of 1833 he set out on horseback on a prospecting tour through western New York, and coming to Herkimer learned of the formation of the Dexter colony, whose destination was Ionia county, Michigan: and visiting Mr. Dexter at his home in Schuyler, the young man decided to go west with him. They left Utica April 25, and arrived in Ionia, May 28 being one month and three days on the road. Arriving here after a journey through an unbroken wilderness extending from Jackson to the Grand river valley, the doctor decided to cast in his lot with the new colony. Coming here thus as one of the pioneers, he has made Ionia his home from that time to this. All old settlers will remember his pleasant home, where he lived so many years, just at the forks of the road south of Grand river. For several years he was the only physician in this region, and frequently traveled into adjoining counties, a distance of 40 miles on horseback. Often it was necessary to ford Grand river, and in the winter when the stream could not be crossed with a horse, he at times went on foot from 30 to 40 miles to visit the sick. He engaged in farming at times; also in the drug business. In 1834 he built the first frame home in Ionia county, which we believe still stands on the original site. In 1837 he married Anthy P. Arnold, daughter of one of the Dexter pioneers, Oliver Arnold. They were the first couple married in Ionia county; he was the first clerk of Ionia township, which then embraced the whole county; the first township meeting being held at the German Indian trading station, 6 miles up the river from the then village of Ionia. He was a whig until the republican party was formed, since that a republican; has been an active member of the Baptist church here since its organization, and was for many years trustee and deacon. The members of the family of the deceased who survive him, are his wife and four children, three daughters and one son, viz.: Mrs. V. S. Eastman, Mrs. H. B. Barnes, Mrs. Geo. W. Nelles and William T. Lincoln. Dr. Lincoln has thus passed the best part of his life in this vicinity, and from first to last he always had the confidence and esteem of all who knew him--and that includes the entire community. He was always a kind husband and father, a good citizen, exemplary in his daily life, a man of piety and a man of his word. His name, like that of the late Dr. Cornell, is a household word throughout Ionia county.


The Ionia Daily Sentinel
Monday, June 12, 1882

DEATH OF DR. LINCOLN.

Dr. William B. Lincoln died at his home in this city this Monday morning at 1 o'clock, in the 75th year of his age. He had been ill for some time and his death was not unexpected. Funeral from the house on Wednesday, at 10 o'clock a. m.
_____

Dr. Lincoln was born in Peru, Bennington county, Vermont, December 29, 1807. He was one of nine children and his father was a farmer. When a young man he taught school in the winter and worked on his father's farm in the summer. He studied medicine in the office of Dr. Abraham Lowell, of Chester, Vermont, and at the age of 25 graduated from the clinical school of medicine in Chester, Vt. In the spring of 1833 he set out on horseback on a prospecting tour through western New York, and coming to Herkimer learned of the formation of the Dexter colony, whose destination was Ionia county, Michigan: and visiting Mr. Dexter at his home in Schuyler, the young man decided to go west with him. They left Utica April 25, and arrived in Ionia, May 28 being one month and three days on the road. Arriving here after a journey through an unbroken wilderness extending from Jackson to the Grand river valley, the doctor decided to cast in his lot with the new colony. Coming here thus as one of the pioneers, he has made Ionia his home from that time to this. All old settlers will remember his pleasant home, where he lived so many years, just at the forks of the road south of Grand river. For several years he was the only physician in this region, and frequently traveled into adjoining counties, a distance of 40 miles on horseback. Often it was necessary to ford Grand river, and in the winter when the stream could not be crossed with a horse, he at times went on foot from 30 to 40 miles to visit the sick. He engaged in farming at times; also in the drug business. In 1834 he built the first frame home in Ionia county, which we believe still stands on the original site. In 1837 he married Anthy P. Arnold, daughter of one of the Dexter pioneers, Oliver Arnold. They were the first couple married in Ionia county; he was the first clerk of Ionia township, which then embraced the whole county; the first township meeting being held at the German Indian trading station, 6 miles up the river from the then village of Ionia. He was a whig until the republican party was formed, since that a republican; has been an active member of the Baptist church here since its organization, and was for many years trustee and deacon. The members of the family of the deceased who survive him, are his wife and four children, three daughters and one son, viz.: Mrs. V. S. Eastman, Mrs. H. B. Barnes, Mrs. Geo. W. Nelles and William T. Lincoln. Dr. Lincoln has thus passed the best part of his life in this vicinity, and from first to last he always had the confidence and esteem of all who knew him--and that includes the entire community. He was always a kind husband and father, a good citizen, exemplary in his daily life, a man of piety and a man of his word. His name, like that of the late Dr. Cornell, is a household word throughout Ionia county. His funeral will be at 10 o'clock a. m. on Wednesday.

 


William D. ARNOLD

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Arnold

The Ionia Daily Sentinel
Monday, January 11, 1909

William D. Arnold died at his home in Saranac at 8 o'clock Sunday morning. He was the twin brother of the late Walter D. Arnold, and father of Fred Arnold, of this city. The funeral will be attended at Saranac. The deceased was 81 years of age.

________________________________

The Ionia Daily Standard
Monday, January 11, 1909

William D. Arnold died at his home in Saranac on Sunday morning at 8 o'clock, aged 81 years, surviving his twin brother, the late Walter D. Arnold of this city, by about three months--to be exact, since Oct. 19th, last. William D. Arnold is survived by the wife, aged 72 years past, and two sons, Fred of Ionia, and Bert, who lives on the old homestead farm in Easton. Deceased was a citizen of most excellent repute, and held the highest esteem of all who know him. Funeral at the late home in Saranac on Wednesday morning at 10:30, and will be private.

 


Walter D. ARNOLD

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Arnold, Kincaid

The Ionia Daily Sentinel
Monday, October 19, 1908

WALTER D. ARNOLD

Pioneer of 1835 Passes Away at Age of Eighty-one.

Walter D. Arnold died this morning at the family home on Lafayette street, at the age of 81 years. He has been an invalid in failing health for several years and for many days his death had been looked for hourly.

Walter D. Arnold was born May 25, 1827. He was the twin brother of William Arnold of Saranac, who survives him. He was prominent in the early history of Ionia county settling in Easton in 1835. He was born in Herkimer county, New York, being the son of Dexter and Olive Arnold.

When Walter was eight years of age, the family started for Michigan, spending long and weary weeks upon the journey and reaching Ionia in the fall of 1835. The family was welcomed here by relatives, the families of Oliver Arnold and Erastus Yeomans. The first home was in a log cabin on a farm in Easton, about where the VanderHeyden place is now.

Walter remained on the farm until he was 21, when he entered the store of Charles Moseman, as bookkeeper. He spent the next six years clerking for Harter, Stephenson and Rich, and in 1854 became a partner of Hampton Rich, with whom he remained in the old "Banner Store" until it was sold to Rich & Northrup.

Mr. Arnold was deputy register of deeds under James Loomis, and later was clerk and steward at the State asylum for several years. He retired from active business life a number of years ago. He was always a strong republican. He joined the Baptist church in 1865 and served the church from that time, being at different times both deacon and trustee.

August 17, 1851, Mr. Arnold married Julia M. Kincaid, who survives him, also three children--Edwin I. Arnold, Miss Emma Arnold and Miss Mary Arnold. One son, Walter, died several years ago.

The family are among the well known citizens of Ionia, and the deceased was an Ionia pioneer and citizen highly regarded, and among those who lived to see Ionia grow from a clearing to the beautiful and prosperous city it now is.

The funeral will be attended from the residence Wednesday morning at 11 o'clock.

________________________________

The Ionia Daily Standard
Monday, October 19, 1908

Walter D. Arnold died at his home on Lafayette street, this morning. Funeral at the house at 11 o'clock on Wednesday forenoon. Deceased was in every sense a representative pioneer and esteemed citizen. He was one of twin boys born on May 25, 1827, in Herkimer county, New York--the sons of Dexter and Olive Kimball Arnold. The brother, William D., survives, and is now a resident of Saranac. The elder Arnold and family came to Michigan in the fall of 1835, and settled in Easton township, a portion of the original farm now being in the Second ward of Ionia city. Ionia proper, at that time, contained four log houses and but one frame building. Deceased was one of the pioneer merchants of this city, and held various positions of public trust in the early days.

 


Dexter ARNOLD

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Arnold

The Ionia [Weekly] Sentinel
Friday, June 13, 1879

Dexter Arnold, one of the pioneers of this county, died at the residence of his son William, in Easton, on Monday, at the age of 84 years. Mr. Arnold came to this county in 1835, and has been a resident here ever since--a period of 44 yrs, during which time he has seen one of the marvelous changes peculiar to this country, in the rapid development from a wilderness to a wealthy, cultivated and prosperous condition. Walter D. Arnold, of this city, is also one of the children of said deceased. The funeral took place at the residence on Wednesday last, the discourse being delivered by Rev. D. A. Richards, of Saranac.

________________________________

The Ionia [Weekly] Standard
Thursday, June 12, 1879

Dexter Arnold, aged eighty-four years, died at the residence of his son, William, in Easton on Monday morning. He was found by the family lifeless in his bed. He was the father of Walter Arnold of this city. The funeral occurred yesterday forenoon, and was attended by the many friends of the deceased.

 


G. Wesley ARNOLD

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Arnold

The Ionia [Weekly] Standard
Friday, March 16, 1888

OBITUARY.

G. Wesley Arnold, better known as "Wet" Arnold, died at his home south of Grand river on Sunday morning after a brief illness, of typhoid fever. He was born in Fairfield, Herkimer Co., N. Y., March 11, 1832, and was therefore a little more than 56 years of age. He was one of a family of seven children, and his father was Oliver Arnold, who left New York state with the Dexter colony in April 1833 arriving here in June of that year. Oliver Arnold was a blacksmith and settled south of Grand river, where he lived until the time of his death, and Wesley succeeded to the old homestead, in Ionia Township where he has lived his entire life it may be truly said, as he was but a little more than one year old when his parents came here. In fact Oliver Arnold was the first man who settled in the township of Berlin, though it is claimed that John E. Morrison made the first location of land at the United States land office. For half a century, from his early boyhood, "Wet" Arnold has been a familiar figure in Ionia. Everybody knew him. There are not many men in or about Ionia whose death would be more generally regretted. Plain, unpretentious, modest, he was contented to pursue the even tenor of his way, and allowed no foolish ambition for place or for riches to interfere with the tranquil current of his life. Industrious, frugal, honest, contentment was a marked characteristic. He was endowed by nature with a fine mind, and it was a treat to talk with him and hear his quaint, sensible views on those subjects which he saw fit to discuss. There was a vein of originality about him that gave to his conversation an unique charm. He was a man of strong personality; mentally his individuality was marked; and he was a man of superb physique; indeed, though he was probably not aware of it himself, he might have posed for a statue of Hercules. All in all, he was one of the men, it is worth while living merely to have known; and who, now that he is gone, will be sadly missed.

His remains were taken to the Balcom cemetery on Tuesday, and consigned to the grave by the odd-fellows of Ionia.

 


James H. ARNOLD

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Arnold

The Ionia [Weekly] Standard
Friday, January 24, 1890

ANOTHER PIONEER GONE.

James H. Arnold died on Monday, at the age of 63 years, at the Arnold homestead, south Ionia. He had been in poor health, suffering several paralytic strokes during the two years last past.

He was born in Herkimer county, New York, in 1826, and came to Ionia in 1833, with his father Oliver Arnold, who was among the earliest settlers in this county. At an early age he learned the trade of edge tool maker, and he and his brother Westley, deceased, for many years enjoyed the distinction of being among the best workers in steel in this country. He was a well informed man, a faithful member of the Baptist society.

The funeral was attended on Wednesday, and interment was in the Balcom cemetery. Revs. Alfred Cornell and J. M. Coe conducted feeling services.

 


Chauncey Fairchild ARNOLD

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Arnold, Banker, Hutton

The Ionia Daily Standard
Tuesday, September 24, 1901

CHAUNCEY F. ARNOLD DEAD.

One of the Original Colony of Ionia County Pioneers.

Chauncey Fairchild Arnold, one of the original colony of Ionia County pioneers, and who has lived here continuously since, passed away last night at 9:23 o'clock, at his home in South Ionia.

Deceased was born in Fairfield, Herkimer county, New York, on April 24, 1824, making him somewhat more than seventy-seven years of age at the time of his death. He was the son of Oliver Arnold, and his mother's maiden name was Susan Hutton; she was buried on the hill south of the old log house, where her husband and three of the family are sleeping. Chauncey Arnold was the father of eight children, but three of whom are now living.

Chauncey Arnold, at the time of his marriage, was a private in the U. S. army, and stationed at Fort Wayne (Detroit). That was long before the civil war--away back in the forties. The bride's name was Velida Banker.

Mrs. Chauncey Arnold died on June 17th, 1900, and was buried in Highland Park, where Mr. Arnold will be laid on Thursday afternoon. At the time of Mrs. Arnold's death, the venerable couple had enjoyed fifty-six years of wedded life.

Funeral at the late home in South Ionia, at two o'clock p. m. on Thursday. Rev. A. B. Griffith of the Disciple church will officiate.
_____

The original colony of pioneers who came to Ionia in 1833 is now reduced to four persons, namely: Stephen F. Dexter of Evart, Mrs. J. B. Sanford, Ionia; Mrs. Prudence Tower, Grand Rapids, and Mrs. Authilda Tefft, of New York. Mrs. Tefft is a sister of Mr. Arnold.

 


Silas D. ARNOLD

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Arnold, Lord

The Ionia Daily Standard
Tuesday, October 18, 1892

Silas D. Arnold, father of Mrs W. N. Lord, Easton, died this morning at the age of 77. Funeral at 9:30 a. m., Thursday, at residence of W. N. Lord; interment in Woodard Lake cemetery.

________________________________

The Ionia Daily Standard
Wednesday, October 19, 1892

Silas Arnold, who died this week, was the only member of the M. E. church of this city who has belonged to it since its first organization. Mrs. W. B. Lincoln is the only survivor of the original organization, but has since joined another society.

 


George Herkimer McMULLEN

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: McMullen, Herkimer, Yeomans, Collins

The Ionia Daily Standard
Thursday, January 31, 1901

Geo. Herkimer McMullen Dead.

Geo. H. McMullen died this morning at 11 o'clock. He recovered appreciably from the paralytic stroke of Tuesday morning, but was too weakened by the grippe and kidney complications to stay the hand of the great reaper. Deceased was 73 years of age, past, and was very widely known among the older people of the county. He is one of the old time and old school of merchants; the present firm of McMullen and Yeomans dates back from the time of the close of the Civil war. Mr. McMullen was born in Herkimer county, New York, which county was named after his grandfather, the illustrious General Herkimer, deceased thus being a lineal descendant of the Herkimer family.
_____

Deceased was a son of David McMullen and Sarah Maria Herkimer. He was born on Dec. 27, 1827, in the town of Danube, New York. He came to Ionia in September of 1852. On July 9, 1856 he was married to Mary Yeomans, daughter of Judge Erastus Yeomans.

In the fall of 1860 he went into the partnership of Hackett & Harter. The firm was afterwards Harter & McMullen. On December 16, 1865, Mrs. McMullen died. In 1866, he and Erastus Yeomans entered into partnership in the drug business which still exists.

December 11, 1867, he was married to Mrs. Martha H. Collins.

 


Olive YEOMANS

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Yeomans, Just

The Ionia Daily Sentinel
Monday, April 13, 1914

MRS. JUST WAS EASTON PIONEER

Her Death Came On Easter Night Following Stroke Of Apoplexy.

Was Born in Easton Township Seventy Years Ago--Leaves Two Brothers and Two Half-Brothers--Funeral Wednesday Afternoon.

Mrs. Olive Y. Just, widow of the late Wm. J. Just and daughter of Sanford A. Yeomans, one of Ionia's pioneer residents, died Easter night at her home on West Main street at 8:45. Mrs. Just was stricken with apoplexy a week ago and steadily failed. She was conscious until within 24 hours of the end. Mrs. Just was found by her brother, Walter Yeomans, in bed and unable to move, having been stricken during the night. Her mind was clear and she remarked that she was not sick. However, she was unable to rise and her speech was affected. Her death followed a rapid breaking down which followed.

Mrs. Just was born in the township of Easton 70 years ago and with the exception of brief times when she lived at Ann Arbor and at Greenville she has been a resident of Ionia county. She leaves two brothers, Walter and Erastus Yeomans, and two half brothers, Edwin and Frank Yeomans. She was married Sept. 21, 1865 to Wm. J. Just.

The funeral will be attended from the residence at two o'clock Wednesday. The request is made that flowers be omitted.

Those desiring to view the remains are invited to call at her late home Wednesday morning between the hours of 10 and 12.

________________________________

The Ionia [Weekly] Standard
Friday, April 17, 1914

THE END OF THE WORLD

Comes to Mrs. Olive Y. Just Sunday Evening.

Mrs. Olive Yeomans Just, who was stricken Monday night, passed away on Easter night at 8:45.

Mrs. Just was one of the few residents whose early life was intimately connected with the early life of Ionia, and her death brings a feeling of sorrow to all whose memories reach back to that period in the history of this city. She was born on the Yeomans' homestead farm, just west of the corporation line, and her home has always been here, except for two short periods after her marriage, when she lived in Ann Arbor and Greenville. She was always a favorite in social circles in her youthful years. During her later years she had lived a life secluded from anything like gayety, but her social qualities have been manifest in a restricted circle and quiet way to the comfort and pleasure of neighbors and intimate friends, who will greatly miss her. She possessed a strong personality, with decided convictions, generous impulses, a quick sense of humor, and decided literary tastes. While shunning publicity, she took an active interest in such public affairs as appealed to her sense of sentiment and conviction, and could be depended upon for liberal aid.

She was born Oct. 22, 1843. She was married to Wm. J. Just Sept. 21, 1865. He died eleven years ago. She leaves four brothers: Erastus T., Walter, Frank H. and Edwin S. Yeomans.

 


Edwin S. YEOMANS

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Yeomans

The Ionia Sentinel-Standard
Saturday, August 26, 1950

YEOMANS RITES TO BE MONDAY

Edwin S. Yeomans, sr., 82, died at his farm home in Easton township Friday afternoon about 3:30. He had been confined to his home since a hip fracture which he suffered in 1943 and had been bedfast for about a year.

Born September 19, 1867 on the farm on which he died, he was the son of Sanford A. and Marietta Yeomans. His parents were members of the original Dexter colony which settled Ionia.

He was president of the Ionia County National Bank from its reorganization in 1933 until his retirement in 1946. Long a member of the Methodist church in Ionia, he had served on its board of directors for many years.

He was preceded in death by his wife, Ola M. Yeomans, who died in 1949. Two brothers, Will and Frank, also are dead. He is survived by three children, Edwin R. Yeomans, jr., Gerald Yeomans, and Mrs Edlin Sweet, all of Ionia. Nine grandchildren also survive.

Funeral services will be held from the Methodist church Monday afternoon at 3 p.m. Dr. Howard A. Smith will officiate. Interment will be in the family lot in Highland Park cemetery. The body will repose at home after Saturday afternoon to the time of the service.

_____

Bank To Close

Ionia County National bank, of which Edwin S. Yeomans was a former president, will close at 2 p.m. Monday for the funeral, according to President Marshall A. Westfall.

_________________________________

The Ionia County News
Thursday, August 31, 1950

PIONEER RESIDENT DIES HERE AFTER LONG ILLNESS

Was Active In Business and Civic Affairs for Years

Edwin S. Yeomans, 83, prominent in Ionia County business life and lifelong resident of Easton township died at his home at 3:30 Friday afternoon, August 25.

Descendant of one of the most widely known pioneer families of the county, he was born September 19, 1867, on the farm where he died Friday. His parents were Mr. and Mrs. Sanford A. Yeomans, of the Dexter Colony which settled in Ionia in 1833.

Mr. Yeomans was the last of the Sanford Yeomans family. Four brothers and a sister, William, Frank, Erastus and Walter Yeomans and Mrs. Olive Just, preceded him in death.

Mr. Yeomans was president of the Ionia County National Bank from 1933 until he was forced by illness to retire in 1946.

He is survived by two sons, Edwin R. and Gerald, Easton township; a daughter, Mrs. Edlin Sweet, Ionia township, and nine grandchildren. Mrs. Yeomans died Nov. 4, 1949.

Rev. Howard A. Smith officiated at the funeral service held from the Methodist Church Monday afternoon. Burial was in the family lot in Highland Park Cemetery. Bearers were, Roy Weber, Clarence Johnson, John Toutenhoofd, John Peterson, Murl Hiler and Brook Fuller.

 


Frank H. YEOMANS

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Yeomans

The Ionia Sentinel-Standard
Monday, February 25, 1946

DEATHS

FRANK H. YEOMANS

Frank H. Yeomans, 82, a lifetime resident of Easton township, suffered a heart attack on the morning of February 23, his birthday anniversary, and died shortly thereafter.

Mr. Yeomans was born February 23, 1864, to Marietta A. and Sanford A. Yeomans, original members of the Dexter colony. He is survived by a brother, Edwin S. Yeomans. Preceding him in death were a brother, Willard; a half-sister, Mrs. Olive Just, and two half-brothers, Erastus T. and Walter Yeomans.

The funeral is to be held from the Myers funeral home Tuesday at 2:30 p.m. The Rev. Dwight Kitch will officiate and interment is to be in the Highland Park cemetery.

_________________________________

The Ionia County News
Thursday, February 28, 1946

OBITUARIES

FRANK H. YEOMANS

Funeral service for Frank H. Yeomans, 82, was held from Myers funeral home Tuesday afternoon. Rev. Dwight M. Kitch officiated and burial was in Highland Park cemetery. Pall bearers were nephews of the deceased, Gerald, Edwin R., Walter and Maurice Yeomans, Edlin Sweet and a cousin, Herbert Ross.

Mr. Yeomans died Saturday, Feb. 23, in Pine Rest hospital, Grand Rapids, on his eighty-second birthday anniversary. The son of Mr. and Mrs. Sanford A. Yeomans, he was born in Easton township, February 23, 1864, and had been a life long resident of Ionia county. He is survived by a brother, Edwin S. Yeomans, Easton; a sister-in-law, Mrs. Willard Yeomans, and several neices and nephews.

 


Willard S. YEOMANS

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Yeomans, Gott

The Ionia Daily Sentinel
Friday, November 6, 1908

DEATH OF WILLARD YEOMANS

Unexpected Result of a Brief Illness.--Funeral Saturday

Willard Sanford Yeomans, son of the late Sanford A. Yeomans, died at his home four and a half miles north of Ionia at nine o'clock Wednesday evening after an illness of several weeks. He would have been fifty years of age had he lived until December 31, of this year, having been born December 31, 1858.

The funeral will be from the late residence Saturday at one o'clock (sun time) in the afternoon. Burial in Highland Park cemetery.

Deceased was a brother of Edward S. and Frank Yeomans and half brother of Erastus T. Yeomans, Mrs. Olive (Yeomans) Just and Senator Walter Yeomans. At the age of 21 he married Miss Pearl Gott who survives him. He also leaves one son and two daughters, Maurice, Margery and Florence, aged 26, 24 and 17 respectively.

Rev. E. E. Branch wil be the officiating clergyman.

_________________________________

The Ionia Daily Standard
Thursday, November 5, 1908

Willard S. Yeomans of Orleans died at 9 o'clock last night. He had been sick about two months, and confined to his bed for five weeks. He would have been 50 years old the 31st of next month. He was a son of the late Sanford A. Yeomans, a half brother of Erastus T., Walter and Mrs. W. J. Just, and brother of Edwin S. and Frank. He leaves a wife, daughter of the late S. W. Gott, and three children, Morris, Margie and Florence, all single and living at home. Funeral from family residence, at 12:30 standard time Saturday; service by Rev. E. E. Branch. Interment, Highland Park.

 


Walter YEOMANS

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Yeomans, Herrick

The Ionia Sentinel-Standard
Tuesday, September 9, 1930

HON. WALTER YEOMANS DEAD AT HOME HERE

Former State Senator and Lifelong Ionia Resident Succumbs to Infirmities of Advanced Age.

Hon Walter Yeomans, former state senator of the twenty-fifth district, retired farmer and banker, died at his home, 1044 West Main street, Tuesday afternoon of an illness induced by the infirmities of advanced age. He was 82 years old.

Born in the home of pioneer parents Hon Sanford A and Abigail Yeomans, early settlers of this county, within a short distance of his parent home in Ionia, Mr Yeomans was a descendant of one of the members of the famous Dexter colony from which grew the village, the city and the county seat.

Mr Yeomans was reared on the farm home in the outskirts of the growing village of Ionia and attended the Ionia school and the Ionia high school. At the age of 20, he married Jane Herrick and was then given a quarter section of unimproved land in Ronald township by his father. He was soon recognized as one of the promising farmers of the community. From the first he gave much attention to civic affairs and during his long residence in Ronald held various township offices. Later he became interested in the wider political affairs and served as state senator. In 1892 he retired from the farm and moved to Ionia and for several years was engaged in the loan and real estate business and served as director of the First National Bank.

His first wife died and he married for the second time. The widow with three children, Byron of Alabama, Mrs Lucius Babcock of Oklahoma, and Roy, of East Orange, N. J., survives, together with two half-brothers, Edward and Frank Yeomans, of Easton township.

_________________________________

The Ionia County News
Thursday, September 11, 1930

FINAL SERVICES TO BE HELD HERE FOR FORMER SENATOR

Hon. Walter Yeomans Will Be Buried Tomorrow; Was 82 Years Of Age

Funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon for Walter Yeomans, former state senator from the 25th district, and retired farmer and banker who died at his home at 1044 West Main street Tuesday afternoon after illness due to his advanced age. He was 82.

Rev. W. K. Spicer will conduct the final services which will be held from the home. Following the wish often expressed by Mr. Yeomans during his life time, all arrangements for flowers were omitted.

Born in the home of pioneer parents, Hon. Sanford A. and Abigail Yeomans, early settlers of this county, within a short distance of his parent home in Ionia, Mr. Yeomans was a descendant of one of the members of the famous Dexter colony from which grew the village, the city, and the county seat.

Mr. Yeomans was reared on the farm home in the outskirts of the growing village of Ionia and attended the Ionia school and the Ionia high school. At the age of 20, he married and was then given a quarter section of unimproved land in Ronald township by his father. He was soon recognized as one of the promising farmers of the community.

From the first he gave much attention to civic affairs, and during his long residence in Ronald held various township offices. Later he became interested in the wider political affairs and served as state senator.

In 1892 he retired from the farm and moved to Ionia and for several years was engaged in the loan and real estate business and served as director of the First National Bank.

Mr. and Mrs. Yeomans celebrated their golden wedding anniversary 12 years ago. The widow with three children, Byron, of Alabama; Mrs. Lucius Babcock, of Oklahoma, and Roy, of East Orange, N. J., survive, together with two half-brothers, Edward and Frank Yeomans, of Easton township.

 


Erastus T. YEOMANS

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Yeomans

The Ionia Daily Sentinel-Standard
Monday, October 25, 1920

Mr. Erastus T. Yeomans passed away Sunday at 1:10 p.m. Funeral at the home Wednesday at 2:00 p.m. No flowers. Dr. and Mrs. W. C. Marsh and daughter of Albion, and Mrs. Fred Peck of Pittsfield, Mass., were at the home at the time. Mr. Peck is expected soon.

_________________________________

The Ionia Daily Sentinel-Standard
Thursday, October 28, 1920

The funeral for Erastus T. Yeomans was held Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the home. The services were in charge of Rev. W. K. Spencer, and the bearers were Walter Yeomans, Ed. Yeomans and Frank Yeomans, Fred Peck of Pittsfield, Mass., Dr. W. C. Marsh of Albion, and Fred Northrop of Lakeview. Interment was in Highland Park. Relatives from out of town were Dr. and Mrs. Marsh and two daughters, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Peck, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Northrup, Mrs. Charlotte Northrop and Mr. and Mrs. Charles Meath of Lakeview. Ionia business men attended the funeral, especially a body of the druggists of the town.

 


Harriet A. YEOMANS

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Yeomans, Thacher

The Ionia Daily Sentinel
Wednesday, January 12, 1910

Death of Mrs. I. H. Thatcher--Mrs. Isaac H. Thatcher died at her home on High street at half past two this afternoon at the age of 73. Arrangements for the funeral have not yet been announced. Deceased was Harriet, youngest and only surviving child of the late Erastus Yeomans who came to Ionia in 1833. She was born here, if we are not mistaken, in 1833 and was until her death, probably the oldest of the survivors of those who were born in Ionia. Mrs. Thatcher was a life long member of the Presbyterian church and no one was more loved and respected. Her husband and one daughter, Mrs. Jay Hills, of Chicago, survive her. An only son, Harland Thatcher, died when a young man.

________________________________

The Ionia [Weekly] Standard
Friday, January 14, 1910

Death of Mrs. I. E. Thacher

Mrs. Isaac E. Thacher passed away at the home on High street, which she graced so many years, at about 2:30 o'clock on Wednesday afternoon, at age of 73 years. She had long been an invalid, but developing complications of inflammation of the lungs was the immediate cause of death. Deceased was Harriet, youngest and only surviving child of the late Erastus Yeomans, who came to Ionia in 1833. She was born here in 1833, and was until her death, probably the oldest of the survivors of those who were born in Ionia. Mrs. Thatcher was a life long member of the Presbyterian church, and no one was more loved and respected. Her husband and one daughter, Mrs. Jay Hills, of Chicago, survive her, and both were at the bedside when the light of the good mother's life went out. An only son, Harland Thacher, died when a young man.

Service from the home, 222 High street, Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock, service by Rev. W. K. Spencer, D. D.

 


Emily YEOMANS

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Yeomans, Babcock

The Ionia [Weekly] Sentinel
Friday, December 27, 1872

DIED.

BABCOCK--On the 20th inst., Emily, wife of Henry S. Babcock, aged 44 years and 6 months.

[Deceased is a daughter of Erastus and Phebe (Arnold) Yeomans.]

 


Sarah Maria YEOMANS

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Yeomans, Sanford

The Ionia Daily Standard
Thursday, January 14, 1904

MRS. MARIA SANFORD.

One of the Original Pioneer Party, Died at St. Louis Last Night.

Telegram received here this morning announces the death at St. Louis, Mich., at 9 last night, of Mrs. Maria Sanford, widow of James B. Sanford, who died about eleven years ago. Mrs. Sanford was a daughter of Judge Erastus Yeomans and sister of the late Sanford A. Yeomans, and was one of the party of 63 persons that formed the original settlers of Ionia in May, 1833. Of this party, only three now survive, none of them residents here. The only surviving member of Judge Yeomans' family is Mrs. I. E. Thacher of this city, who was born here.

Mrs. Sanford was about 78 years of age. Seven children survive: Mrs. Mary Hobbs of Colorado, Herbert of Grand Rapids, Wiliam and "Bunny" of Illinois, Mrs. Fannie Burns of St. Louis, Mich., and Mrs. Hughes of Mecosta.

Remains will arrive here Saturday at 11:30, and funeral service will be at St. John's Episcopal church, at 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon.

 


Sanford A. YEOMANS

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Yeomans, Arnold, Thompson, Stebbins

The Ionia [Weekly] Standard
Friday, January 8, 1896

THE LATE HON. SANFORD A. YEOMANS.

Sanford A. Yeomans was born in German Flats, Herkimer county, N. Y., Nov. 29, 1816. He was the eldest of nine children. His father was Erastus Yeomans, one of the original (or Dexter) colony of 5 families who came to the valley of the Grand river and founded the city of Ionia in the year 1833. His mother was Phoebe (Arnold) Yeomans. Erastus Yeomans was born in Lebanon, Conn., and Phoebe Arnold in Smithfield, Rhode Island. So it will be seen that the subject of this sketch came from good, old New England stock.

Erastus (or Judge) Yeomans was the first postmaster of Ionia; he was elected a county judge, was one of the original pillars of the Baptist church in this town, and to the day of his death retained the respect and confidence of his fellow citizens. His home in the early days was in the house which still stands near the corner of West Main and Yeomans street.

Sanford A., then a boy of seventeen, came to Ionia with his parents in 1833. In 1840, he located 40 acres of government land in the township of Easton, settled and improved it and made it his home, adding to it from time to time until he had one of the best farms in Ionia county--the farm on which he lived for 55 years and on which he died, at 10:30 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 19, 1895.

In 1840, he married Abigail Thompson, niece of Dexter Arnold. She died after bearing him four children, three of whom, two sons and one daughter, survive, viz: Erastus T., Walter, and Mrs. W. J. Just. In 1848, he was married to Marietta A., daughter of the late Chauncey M. Stebbins. Six children were born to them, three of whom survive, viz: Willard S., Frank H. and Edwin S. Yeomans.

 


Barbara YEOMANS

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Yeomans, Dunham

The Ionia [Weekly] Sentinel
Thursday, August 18, 1881

Mrs. Barbara Yeomans, wife of Judge Erastus Yeomans, died Sunday afternoon. She was found lying dead on the floor toward evening, having fallen down, while alone, in a paralytic fit. She had a stroke of paralysis several years ago. Deceased was the second wife of Mr. Yeomans. Her first husband was Mr. ------- Dunham, of Orleans. She was the mother of Salem Dunham, of this city.

 


Erastus YEOMANS

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Yeomans, Arnold

The Ionia Daily Sentinel
Monday, June 11, 1883

ERASTUS YEOMANS.

Judge Erastus Yeomans, the last survivor of the original colony of pioneers who settled in Ionia fifty years ago, died peacefully at his home in this city at 8 o'clock Friday evening, June 8th--precisely eleven days after the fiftieth anniversary of the date of his arrival on the spot where he died. The funeral services were held in the Baptist church on Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock. The sermon was by Rev. James Lamb, and was very appropriate and impressive. The bearers were Lewis S. Lovell, Alex F. Bell, Osmond Tower, James M. Kidd, John L. Taylor and C. O. Thompson. The remains were deposited in Oak Hill cemetery, within a stone's throw of the house where for half a century he had lived and where at last he died full of years, taking with him to his grave the respect and esteem of all who ever knew him, and leaving behind him the memory of a well-ordered and useful life.

The following brief sketch will be read with deep interest by hundreds of his old friends throughout Ionia county and other parts of the state.

_____

Erastus Yeomans, youngest son of Daniel and Esther Yeomans, was born in New Lebanon, Conn., Aug. 11, 1791. His ancestry, as the name implies, was of pure English stock, who came to this country near the close of the Seventeenth century. He was educated in the schools of his native place and as a student, early gave evidence of a superior mind. At the age of sixteen he removed with his parents to German Flats, Herkimer Co., N. Y. The following year he engaged as teacher in one of the public schools of the county, continuing in the same school nearly three years. Soon after this occurred the war of 1812, with Great Britain, in which he demonstrated his fitness to be a citizen of the republic, by taking his place in the ranks of her defenders. March 19th, 1815, he married Phebe Arnold, daughter of Job and Hannah Arnold, of Fairfield, N. Y. Any sketch of the life of Mr. Yeomans, however brief, would be comparatively valueless, that should fail to acknowledge the fact, that in the marriage with Miss Arnold, a factor was added to his life-work, by the power of which was given the solution so perfectly expressed by Solomon in the words: "Her husband is known in the gates when he sitteth among the elders of the land." From his marriage, for about fifteen years, he engaged in farming and brick-making. April 20, 1833, Mr. Yeomans and family joined a colony of five families, and emigrated to the then territory of Michigan. The magnitude of such an undertaking can at this time scarcely be estimated. After a journey of thirty-nine days, the last half of the distance from Detroit being through a trackless wilderness, the little colony reached their destination, the present site of Ionia city, May 28th, 1833. Small patches of corn and vegetables purchsed from the Indians, constituted all that could be grown for the subsistance of the colony the first year. With the work of organization peculiar to a new country, no one of the pioneers was more closely identified or efficient. He was appointed first postmaster of Ionia county, in 1834, receiving his commission from Amos Kendall, postmaster-general in the cabinet of Andrew Jackson, which position he held for six years. In 1841 he was elected associate judge of the county, an office in which he served eight years. For thirty of the fifty years which he lived in Ionia, as township, village and city, he was continually the recipient of unsought official trust. His death, in his ninety-second year, severs the last visible bond between pioneer struggles and our present success and prosperity, in the midst of which, the lesson from such a life should cause us to remember that,--

"Ill fares the land to hastening ills a prey,
Where wealth accumulates and men decay."

No better eulogy can be said of him than that he enters into rest with the silvery radiance cast athwart his brow by the sunset of life, undimmed by a single charge of wrong to his fellow men.

________________________________

The Ionia [Weekly] Standard
Friday, June 15, 1883

Another Pioneer Gone.

"Judge Erastus Yeomans, the last survivor of the original colony of pioneers who settled in Ionia, fifty years ago, died peacefully at his home in this city, at 8 o'clock Friday evening, June 8." It may truthfully be said of Judge Yeomans, that he was a man of mark; that when he came to this locality he brought with him a broad and symmetrical Christian character, a firm purpose and an arm to pull even with any man, not only to make grass grow where it never grew before, and to carve for himself a home out of the wilderness, but also to build up a civilization and society that should bless those who were to come after him. How well he and that noble wife and mother who passed to her reward years before him, as well as the other pioneers who came with them, did their work. How deeply they stamped their character, on society, and left their impress for good, let Ionia with its surroundings, its schools, its churches and its privileges tell. Surely such men would give an exalted character to any community. Judge Yeomans early embraced the Christian religion, and shortly after attaining his majority united with the Baptist church, of which he was a member at the time of his death, at the ripe old age of ninety-two years, and it may be added that for nearly fifty years he was one of its honored deacons, as well as an active member in all its benevolent enterprises. But one more is left of the constituent members of that church and society which he here helped to form, and to sustain and upbuild which he contributed so liberally of his means. He has gone to his reward, but his life work remains a rich inheritance to his family and a blessing to the community.

 


Hattie A. DEXTER

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Dexter, True

The Evart Review
Friday, October 17, 1879

An interesting event of the week was a nuptial affair at the residence of the Hon. John C. Dexter, on Wednesday, the 15th inst., where in the presence of a large company of invited guests, Miss Hattie Dexter and Frank A. True were joined in wedlock. The happy couple took the afternoon train for Flint.

________________________________

The Evart Review
Friday, October 24, 1879

--True-Dexter.--Married at the residence of Hon John C. Dexter, Evart, Mich., Oct. 15th, by S. F. Dexter, Esq., Mr. Frank A. True, to Miss Hattie A. Dexter, all of Evart.

The wedding was a pleasant affair and passed off apparently to the satisfaction of a large number of invited guests. The bride was the happy recipient of many beautiful and costly gifts from friends at home and abroad, which were more expressive than words, of the esteem in which she is held, by her large circle of acquaintances. The newly wedded left on the first train east, for a visit among the groom's friends, in Flint, Mich. Cheerful adieus were uttered and the prayers of all hearts seemed to be:

May joy go with them on life's way,
Peace, with them kindly wait;
Love's links grow brighter day by day,
Till they reach the Golden Gate.

X.
________________________________

The Evart Review
Friday, July 2, 1880

DIED.

In this village June 29th, ult. Hattie A. wife of F. A. True, and only daughter of the Hon. John C. Dexter. Aged 28 years.

It is with feelings of the deepest sorrow and sadness that we chronicle the above event. No death in the history of this village since our residence here, has created such profound grief, and such intense regrets as the one above mentioned. The deceased came here some nine years ago, when, what is now a pleasant and thriving village, was simply a break in an almost unbroken forest, and all along, through these years has been closely identified with and an active agent in forwarding all its social and literary interests. Pleasing in her address, amiable in disposition, affable in all her intercourse with her acquaintances she won to her many friends, who, while they deeply and sincerely mourn her unexpected death, will ever cherish the memory of her many virtues. Her stricken and sorely bereaved husband, and father has the sincere sympathy of this entire community. Her funeral was largely attended yesterday from her late residence on Main street. The services being conducted by Mrs. R. Shepard of Minneapolis.

________________________________

Excerpt from biographical sketch of Frank A. True.
Portrait and Biographical Album of Osceola County
Chicago: Chapman Bros.,1884, page 247

Mr. True was married Oct. 15, 1879, at Evart, to Harriet A., daughter of Hon. John C. Dexter. She was born Feb. 23, 1852, in Ionia, Mich., died June 29, 1880, at Evart, and is buried at Ionia.

 


Theodore F. DEXTER and Ophelia Cook DEXTER

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Dexter, Cook

The Ionia County Sentinel
Tuesday, September 18, 1866

MARRIED.

DEXTER-COOK.--At Gilbert's Mills, Oswego Co. N. Y., on the 3d inst., by Rev. Mr. Pullman, Mr. Theodore F. Dexter, of Ionia, Mich., and Miss Ophelia Cook, of the first named place.

________________________________

The Ionia Sentinel
Friday, March 7, 1873

Obituary.--The many friends of Mrs. Theodore F. Dexter will learn with sadness the news of her death, which occurred a few days since at the residence of her father in New York. We copy the following account of her death from the Fulton Patriot:

"We published in our last the announcement of the death of Mrs. Ophelia Dexter, daughter of Capt. E. S. Cook, of Gilberts' Mills. Mrs. Dexter had been sick for several years with varying prospects of life and death before her, and yet, though young, with otherwise bright anticipations and a hopeful happy nature she never repined and made others unhappy by continually bringing forward her own troubles as a theme of thought or conversation. At the last she lay for weeks unable to move without assistance and yet she was ever thoughtful of those around her, and more mindful of their needs and comforts than her own. Her hopeful nature buoyed her up to the last--not that she would recover--but it carried with it its own sunshine, its own life and warmth. She talked to me as calmly of the new home to which she felt she was soon to take her departure as of her other western home which she had left months since never to see again. The grave had no terrors for her. It was but the passage way to the better, peceful, painless life, the other side. We saw her a few days before her death and she talked of the friends who had gone before, of those we knew, dear ever to be treasured friends--and counted how happy she would be to meet them there. With a calm and faithful reliance on Him who made the way for us all, she reached out her hand not in blindness and doubting, but with a soul-satisfying assurance that she would be lead to the place prepared for her in her Father's house. She died as she had lived, strong, hopeful and cheery. A younger sister went before her but a few weeks, and she leaves a husband, two sisters and parents, for whose coming she will watch and wait in the sunny flowery Land of the Blessed. May her faith be their faith, her patient wating and freely going be theirs when the time shall come which brings them down to where the cool waters of the flowing river lave the shores of the here and hereafter."

________________________________

The Evart Review
Friday, September 18, 1874

Death of Theodore F. Dexter

We regret to have to announce the death of Theodore F. Dexter, which occurred on Wednesday last. Mr. Dexter was born in Ionia in 1844, and was consequently only 30 years of age. He was engaged with the provision establishment of L. H. Dexter & Co., of this village, and was a young man of excellent business qualities. He was buried with Masonic honors, of which fraternity he was a member. His funeral was largely attended. The physicians pronounced his disease appoplexy.

 


Helen E. DEXTER

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Dexter, Ellwood

Excerpt from biographical sketch of Hon. Chauncey Ellwood.
Portrait and Biographical Album of
DeKalb County, Illinois
Chicago: Chapman Brothers, 1885, pages 240-246.

Hon. Chauncey Ellwood, Mayor of Sycamore (1885).

Mr. Ellwood was again married in November, 1857, in Ionia, Mich., to Helen E., daughter of Samuel and Anna Dexter. Three children were born of this marriage: Florence was born Nov. 14, 1858, and died Sept. 30, 1859; John D. was born Feb. 9, 1860, and is now a resident of De Kalb. He married Emma, daughter of Thomas and Eleanor Combs, of the city of De Kalb. Anna was born Sept. 11, 1864. Their mother died March 5, 1866, at Sycamore. She was a lady of finely disciplined mind and possessed unusual earnestness and decision of character. Her married life was passed in the conscientious discharge of every duty as wife and mother. The qualities she exercised as a friend and neighbor built for her a memorial more enduring than marble, and she is still mentioned with admiration and appreciation by those who were the objects of her consideration and esteem.

 


Don JONES

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Jones, Dexter

The Ionia Standard
Friday, January 31, 1890

DON JONES.

Don Jones died at his home on Union street, on Sunday evening. Though not intensely painful, yet his illness was lingering, at last passing away peacefully, a faithful exhibition of a characteristic for which he was honored all through his many years in our midst. A quieter, more peaceful and unobtrusive personage than was Don Jones does not live among us.

The deceased was born in Washington county, N. Y., May 30, 1817, and on attaining his majority, came to Michigan, stopping at Brooklyn, Jackson county, where he remained for several years and was married to Anna Ferris, a sister of J. B. Ferris, by whom he had two children--Marcus F. Jones, now living in Allegan county, and Mrs. L. W. Chapman, of Grand Ledge. Mrs. Jones died soon after the birth of her second child in 1849. In 1851, Mr. Jones came to Ionia, and married Emeline, daughter of Judge Samuel Dexter, and soon after that event he moved to Ionia and made this place his permanent home, the greater part of the time engaged in the blacksmith business. Two years ago Mrs. Jones passed away and Mr. Jones seems never to have recovered from the blow then inflicted and seemed to court death rather than avoid it.

His five children are alive, and truly mourn the loss of a good father. Besides the two above, the children are Julia, wife of S. M. Smead, Myra, wife of W. E. Kidd, and Don Percy.

The burial took place on Wednesday morning, and the remains were followed to their last earthly resting place by a long line of friends.

 


Emeline DEXTER

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Dexter, Jones

The Ionia Standard
Friday, February 3, 1888

OBITUARY.

Mrs. Don Jones died very unexpectedly at her home on Sunday evening last, after a brief illness of only a week. The announcement was a sad surprise to her many friends, as even her relatives did not realize she was so seriously ill until the day of her death.

Mrs. Jones was 59 years old on the 22nd of October last. She was a daughter of Samuel Dexter, who made the original entry of the land where Ionia now stands and who came here in 1833 from the state of New York. She was one of nine children: five daughters and four sons. Three sisters and one brother survive her, viz: Mrs. Alonzo Sessions and Mrs. Jonathan Tibbits, of Ionia; Mrs. Prudence Tower, of Grand Rapids, and Stephen F. Dexter, of Evart. Three brothers and one sister died before her, viz: Horace, Lorenzo and John C. Dexter, and Mrs. Elwood, of Sycamore, Ill. She has had three children, all of whom, besides her husband, survive her. They are Mrs. S. F. Smead, of Caro, and Mrs. H. E. Kidd and D. Percy Jones, of Ionia.

Mrs. Jones was an affectionate wife, a devoted mother, and a kind and hospitable neighbor. She had lived in Ionia most of the time since the very first settlement of the village site, and in all her wide acquaintance in the community there is not one who will not hear the announcement of her death with deep regret. While she was devoted to her home, she was not neglectful of society duties, and her pleasant manner, her charitable opinions and her excellent common sense made her welcome in every home, and made her own home a delightful resort for her many friends. She was a spiritualist in religion, and her belief in that doctrine was unshaken to the last. Her whole life was a bright example of pure womanhood, and its whole influence for good. She had a profound belief in the immortality of the soul, and in the happiness to be enjoyed by freed spirits in the world to come, but her catholic mind had no censure for those of the more orthodox faiths who differed with her. It will be a bold theologian who, knowing her, can venture to doubt that her reward is sure and ever with the blest.

 


Stephen F. DEXTER

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Dexter

The Evart Review
Friday, May 6, 1904

Stephen F. Dexter Dead

The editor received word Monday morning of the death of S. F. Dexter, which occurred the day previous. Our readers had been aware of the serious nature of Mr. Dexter's illness, and that it was but a question of time when he would pass away, nevertheless a universal expression of regret was evident at the demise of one so long identified with our business and social affairs, though for past two years retired from active pursuits.

Stephen Franklin Dexter was born in Herkimer County, N. Y., Nov. 13, 1823, and died at the home of his nephew, D. M. Tower, 531 Jefferson street, Grand Rapids, May 1, 1904, in his 81st year. He came to Michigan with his father's family in 1833, and settled in Ionia, and he with his sister, Mrs. Prudence Tower, who survives him, were the last of the original pioners of that county. Mr. Dexter was in business for a time at Kidville, and in the fifties went to California, going overland via Kansas City, returnng to Michigan in 1866, being one of the passengers on the first passenger train on the newly completed Union Pacific railroad. He came to Evart in 1873, and engaged in the insurance business. He was elected village clerk in 1874, and Justice of the Peace in 1878, which office he held continuously for twenty-four years. He was active in politics, and served for a time as chairman of the Republican County Committee. He was a member of Evart Lodge F. & A. Masons, and served as warden and secretary. In business matters he was prompt and of strictest integrity, his official work was transacted with great care and faithfulness. He was dignified and honorable in his walk as man and citizen, and none knew him but to admire him. When his health failed, disqualifying him for business, his family friends solicited the privilege to care for him, but his self pride caused him to refuse the kindly offers. He went to the Masonic Home for a time, and last November while visiting his aged sister at the Tower home, he was taken with a relapse and he never left the house again. He received to the last the best possible attention that kind and loving hands could bestow.

Mr. Dexer's wife died a number of years ago, and is survived by one son, Czar, who lives in Missaukee county. Interment was made at Ionia yesterday.

________________________________

The Ionia Daily Standard
Monday, May 2, 1904

Death of Stephen F. Dexter.

Stephen F. Dexter, the last remaining son of Samuel Dexter, the head of the original colony settling at Ionia, died at Grand Rapids, on Sunday, at home of his sister, Mrs. Prudence Tower, where he went last fall. When Stephen was ten years old he came to Grand River valley with his father, who took up land both where Grand Rapids now stands and on the site of Ionia, choosing this place as his home. Decedent was 80 years old Nov. 13, 1903. During his life in Ionia he was in company for a time in the dry goods business with his brother, John C. Dexter. He was also for a time a partner of Jas. M. Kidd at Kiddville. About 1851 he went to California, where he was married, and remained west about 30 years. On his return to Michigan, he located at Evart, where he has since been a resident.

The funeral will be held at the Tower residence, Grand Rapids, at 1 p.m. tomorrow. Remains will be brought here for interment in the family lot at Oak Hill cemetery, arriving by the 4 o'clock train.

 


Prudence D. DEXTER

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Dexter, Dallas, Tower

The Grand Rapids Evening Press
Monday, March 6, 1905

LAST OF THE BAND

Mrs. D. F. Tower, Pioneer, Has Passed Away.

CAME IN INDIAN DAYS

With First of the Grand River Valley Settlers.

Journeyed Through the Wilderness to Ionia and Thence to Grand Rapids

Mrs. D. F. Tower, the last member of the original party which settled the Grand River Valley almost seventy-two years ago, died last night at her home, 531 Jefferson avenue, after an illness of some three weeks duration. Mrs. Tower was nearly 83 years of age.

The deceased, prior to her marriage to William Dallas in 1839, was Prudence Dexter. She was born in Herkimer, N. Y., April 22, 1822, and was one of the party that started from that place under the leadership of her father, in April, 1833. The party consisted of sixty-three persons, and the trip was made to eastern Michigan by canal boat and sailing vessel on the lakes. From Pontiac to Ionia, the party worked its way through an unbroken wilderness.

First Stopped at Ionia.

The Dexters settled what is now Ionia, and called it Washington Center. They found an Indian settlement at the place, and were forced to purchase the Indians' crops in order to secure possession peaceably. For some time, those of the party who did not come on to Grand Rapids lived in wigwams left by the Indians. A portion of the original party came on to Grand Rapids, where they found just two white men, Louis Campau and a missionary named Slater.

One son, John Dallas of San Francisco, was born to Mrs. Tower by her first marriage, and survives her. William Dallas died some three years after the wedding, and the widow married Daniel F. Tower in 1847, and came with him to Grand Rapids. Mrs. Tower's father had taken up land in Grand Rapids, and Fulton Street park of today ocupies a portion of the original Dexter estate. The homestead occupied by Mrs. Tower stood on about the site of the present government building.

Daniel F. Tower died in 1880 and since then, Mrs. Tower made her home with her children. They are Daniel W. Tower, president of the Grand Rapids Brass company, Elizabeth and Belle M. Tower.

Mrs. Tower went peacefully to sleep last Monday evening, and from that time until her death was unconscious.

The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 3 o'clock from the house. The Rev. J. Herman Randall will officiate. Friends of the family and members of the Old Settlers' Association are particularly invited to be present.

 


Celia DEXTER

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Dexter, Sessions

The Ionia Standard
Friday, July 11, 1890

MRS. ALONZO SESSIONS DEAD.

A Bright Mark Gone From The Ranks Of Ionia's Pioneers

Mrs. Celia Dexter Sessions, widow of the late Alonzo Sessions, died shortly before 9 o'clock Wednesday eve., at the farm home in Berlin, a home which she has graced, and where she has spent a useful period of more than half a century.

It is said of Mrs. Sessions, and it is perhaps especially true when applied to the present population of Ionia county, that she had not a wide personal acquaintance, yet was she widely known of, and respected as a woman of genuine worth.

Mrs. Sessions was in her 71st year; born February 23, 1820. She was the second daughter of Samuel Dexter, known as Ionia's first settler. Two sisters and one brother survive her, Mrs. Jonathan Tibbetts of Berlin, Mrs. Prudence Tower of Grand Rapids, and Stephen F. Dexter of Evart, this state.

Mrs. Sessions was a devoted mother to her large family. Of the thirteen children born to her seven are yet among the living: John A. Sessions of Berlin, H. C. Sessions of Dakota, Frank A. Sessions, cashier of the first national bank, R. D. Sessions, clerk of the S. H. of C., Mrs. Prof. E. M. Shelton of Brisbin, Australia, Mrs. Dr. Covert of Casselton, North Dakota, and Miss Carrie Sessions.

The funeral is being attended this Friday morning, from the homestead in Berlin. The interment will be at Highland Park.


Louisa H. T. DEXTER

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Dexter, Tower

The Evart Review
Friday, February 25, 1881

It is our painful duty to-day to announce the death of Mrs. Eliza Dexter, who closed her eyes on the things of earth on Wednesday morning about 6 o'clock. Mrs. Dexter was a very estimable lady, and will be remembered as the consort of the late John C. Dexter, who preceded his wife on his journey to the "mysterious realms of shade" only about one short year. Mrs. Dexter came to Evart from Ionia in 1873, and was, in consequence, one of our oldest citizens. She died at the advanced age of sixty-one years, highly esteemed, beloved and respected by all who were blessed with her acquaintance. The funeral services were held at the late residence, Rev. Crittenden officiating, on Thursday a.m. at 10 o'clock, being placed on board the noon train for Ionia, where they will be interred.

_________________________________

The Evart Review
Friday, March 4, 1881

Memorial.

Again have we been called to mourn the loss of a faithful friend of temperance. There's not one of our union but feels that in the death of Mrs. Dexter, we have lost a friend whose place will be hard to fill. Her faithful work with the children was a source of pleasure to her, and a profit to them. Few of our circle had made so thorough a study of alcohol and its workings on the human system; and her thorough understanding of the evils arising from its use, made her a safe guide to the young. Let us hope and pray, that the seed sown by her hand may yield a plentiful harvest.

W. C. T. U.

_________________________________

The Ionia Standard
Thursday, March 3, 1881

Mrs. John C. Dexter.

We barely spoke last week of the death of Mrs. Dexter, so well known to the citizens of Ionia. She was the sister of Osmond Tower, and was the second wife of John C. Dexter, whose father, Samuel Dexter, founded Ionia. Mrs. Dexter had no children. During her residence here, she was always known as a woman of rare enterprise and business ability. Before her marrige she was employed as a teacher for many years. At one time she had a select school over the store now occupied by Godfrey Gundrum. Educational interests were always foremost in her mind. In 1873, the family moved to Evart and she lived there until her death.

The Evart Review says: It is our painful duty to-day to announce the death of Mrs. Louisa Dexter, who closed her eyes on the things of earth on Wednesday morning about 5 o'clock. Mrs. Dexter was a very estimable lady, and will be remembered as the consort of the late John C. Dexter, who preceded his wife on his journey to the "pale realms of shade" only about one short year. Mrs. Dexter came to Evart from Ionia in 1873, and was, in consequence, one of our oldest citizens. She died at the advanced age of 61 years, highly esteemed, beloved and respected by all who were blessed with her acquaintance.

Her remains were brought to Ionia for burial and the sad procession moved to the cemetery amid a blinding storm. As the funeral services had been held at Evart, there were no services here.

With Mrs. Dexter's death, the last of John C. Dexter's family passes from earth. Their fate has been as extraordinary as it has been sad. Mr. Dexter had buried seven children when he left Ionia for Evart, and Theodore and Hattie alone were left. The first of these married a young woman of unusual attractions. Her married life was brief, living but a few short years after her marriage. Close upon the removal of the family to Evart news came of the death of Theodore. Early last summer another chapter was added to the family's sad history by the decease of "Hattie," who had but a short time before donned her bridal robes. In six weeks the father died and all Ionia shuddered at the news. Last week the last touches were made to this melancholy picture and the busy stream of life passes over the memory of the last of the family of John C. Dexter. Let their many friends drop a passing tear in rememberance of their many noble deeds.

 


John C. DEXTER

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Dexter

The Evart Review
Friday, July 23, 1880

DIED.

DEXTER.--At his residence in this village Wednesday morning the 21st inst., after an illness of only a few days, John C. Dexter, Aged 63 years.

No event in the history of this village has thrown so heavy a pall over this community as the one above mentioned. Mr. Dexter was one of the pioneers of the village, coming here in 1873, and engaging in the flour and feed business, which he carried on up to the time of his death. During the past year he has been interested in the Evart & Osceola logging rail road, and has ever been intimately connected with the advancement and improvements of our village, serving as President for four consecutive years. He was a man honored and respected by all who knew him, and held in high esteem by his acquaintances and business associates. His death is felt by the whole community, who sympathise with the bereaved wife and friends. His remains were taken to Ionia for interment, this Friday morning and were followed to the depot by a large concourse of friends, including the Board of Trustees in a body. All the business places in the village were closed duirng the forenoon, out of respect to his memory.

_________________________________

The Ionia Daily Sentinel
Friday morning, July 23, 1880

Funeral of J. C. Dexter.

The remains of the late Jno. C. Dexter will arrive here on the four o'clock train this afternoon. The funeral will be at ten o'clock to-morrow (Saturday) from the residence of Hon O. Tower. The Rev. Mr. Sample, Unitarian clergyman from Gd. Haven, will officiate. Friends of the family are invited to attend.

_________________________________

The Ionia Daily Sentinel
Saturday morning, July 24, 1880

Mr. Dexter's funeral will occur this morning at ten o'clock, at the residence of Hon O. Tower. Friends of the family are invited. It is suggested and requested that business be suspended, and business houses closed for half an hour, while the funeral prcession is passing from the house to the cemetery, as an expression of respect for the memory of an old and universally honored citizen. The remains arrived on the six o'clock train last evening, and were accompanied by Mrs. Dexter, wife of deceased, S. F. Dexter, his brother, Mrs. and Mrs. Ball, Mr. True of Evart, and Mrs. Tower, of Gd. Rapids. The following gentlemen were at the depot as pall-bearers: Sylvester Taylor, Benj. Harter, H. Rich, J. M. Kidd, L. D. Smith and Ethan S. Johnson, all old friends and neighbors.

_________________________________

The Ionia Daily Sentinel
Sunday morning, July 25, 1880

The funeral services of the late John C. Dexter took place yesterday, and were attended by a large body of our citizens, especially the earlier settlers and most of the business men. The Rev. S. W. Sample of Grand Haven preached an exceedingly appropriate sermon. Flags throughout the city were at half-mast and business was for a time suspended in token of respect.

_________________________________

The Ionia Standard
Thursday, July 29, 1880

The remains of John C. Dexter were brought to this city on Friday evening of last week, and the funeral services were held at the residence of his brother-in-law, the Hon. O. Tower, on Saturday and were attended by a very large number of our citizens, especially the old residents, who came to Ionia at the same time with the deceased and soon after, and with him had helped to lay the foundations of the now flourishing city of Ionia. The ceremonies were conducted by Rev. L. W. Sample of Grand Haven, whose discourse on the occasion was one of the finest as well as most appropriate that it was ever our good fortune to listen to. His eloquent tribute to the life and character of the deceased found a ready response in the hearts of the large audience, most of whom had been associated with him for many years, who knew his worth, and honored him for his many excellent traits of character.

"Verily, a good man has fallen."

 


John C. DEXTER announcement of marriage

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Dexter, Steele

The Grand Rapids Enquirer
Friday, September 23, 1842

MARRIED.

In Ionia, on the 13th inst., by the same [Rev. H. D. Buttolph], Mr John C. Dexter to Miss Phebe Steele, all of Ionia.

The following ceremony, which we think was rather "cute," was used upon the occasion, and we give it for the edification of the brethren of the cloth:

I.
If each of you with heart sincere,
Do pledge to love, to serve, and fear;
In sickness, health, in want or wealth,
Unite to live as one till death.

II.
If from all others you decide,
Who court your love
you'l turn aside,
Then join your hands, that you may be
Who're two but one; by God's decree.

III.
Hearts joined and hands, if witness be
'
Tis all that's claimed by Man's decree
Be Husband, Wife, till life shall end
With heavens smiles the same to attend.

 


Mary DEXTER

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Dexter, Tibbitts

The Ionia Standard
Friday, August 11, 1893

Mrs. Jonathan Tibbitts died at Greenville Wednesday. Her maiden name was Mary Dexter, and she was the eldest daughter of Samuel Dexter, the founder of Ionia. She lived in Ionia and Berlin until about a year ago, when she took up her residence with her daughter in Greenville. She was 78 years of age. Services will be held at residence in Greenville this morning, and the remains will arrive on the 11:05 a.m. train. Interment will be in Balcom cemetery, Berlin, about noon, where services will be conducted by Rev. A. Cornell.

_________________________________

The Greenville Independent
Thursday, August 17, 1893

Mrs. Jonathan Tibbits died Aug. 9 at her home in Greenville at the age of 78 years. Mrs. Tibbits' maiden name was Mary Dexter, and she was the eldest daughter of the late Samuel Dexter, leader of the colony which settled Ionia. Mr. and Mrs. Tibbits have been for more than fifty years redidents of Ionia and vicinity, having come to Greenville in their old age to make their home with a son and daughter. The body was taken for interment to Balcom cemetery in Ionia, where Rev. A. Cornell conducted the services. Mrs. Tibbits was mother of A. H. Tibbits, Mrs. Jennie Tibbits and Mrs. T. M. Benedict of Greenville, and of other children elsewhere. The Ionia Sentinel says: "Mrs. Tibbits was a most amiable and estimable lady whose many excellent qualities made her greatly beloved and respected by a wide circle of friends and acquaintances."

 


Lorenzo DEXTER

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Dexter

The Ionia Daily Sentinel
Monday, April 11, 1881

Lorenzo Dexter, who will be remembered as one of the early pioneers of this place, a son of the late Samuel Dexter, and brother of John C. Dexter, is dead, the news of his death having just been received by his friends here. For many years he has resided in California, whence he removed from Ionia somewhere between 1850 and 1860.

_________________________________

The Ionia Daily Sentinel
Tuesday, April 12, 1881

Lorenzo Dexter whose death has been already noticed, removed from Ionia to California in 1850, and at first engaged in mining. He afterwards bought a farm in Tolo [Yolo] county, on which he resided till the time of his death. He had three children, two sons and a daughter all of whom are living in California. Thirty years ago the deceased was a familiar figure at the old red mill, with its big overshot wheel and the water trough which ran over the street, furnishing the motive power for grinding grists. It was the same mill which, rebuilt, remodelled and furnished with steam power is now called novelty mills. The last man who was identified with its early history is now gone.

 


Anna DEXTER

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Dexter

The Ionia Sentinel
Friday, June 19, 1874

OBITUARY.

Death of a Pioneeer.

In this city, on the 13th inst., after a long and painful illness, died Anna, relict of the late Samuel Dexter, in the eightieth year of her age.

The death of Mrs. Dexter takes from our midst another of the pioneer settlers of Ionia--the little band composed of Samuel Dexter, Erastus Yeomans, Oliver Arnold, Darius Winsor, Joel and Edward Guild, with their wives and families, who came here in the spring of 1833, and who were the first actual settlers in Ionia County.

Of those who were heads of families at that time, we believe only one now remains--Judge Erastus Yeomans; although the colony numbered several young men and women, among whom were Dr. W. B. Lincoln, two or three children of Mr. and Mrs. Dexter's, and others.

Mrs. Dexter was the mother of a large family at the time they came here, and most of her children survive her and now mourn the loss and cherish the memory of her who, despite the disadvantages incident to a new and sparsely settled region, so trained them up in the "way they should go," that none are more honored or respected than are they. No higher meed of praise can be awarded than this, and "her children rise up and call her blessed."

Forty-one years have elapsed since these six families came into the then unbroken wilderness. Mrs. Dexter lived to see a city of over 3,000 inhabitants built up, where two or three wigwams were the only structures when she came; she saw the first steamboat ascend Grand river; heard the whistle of the first locomotive that rushed along over the first iron track laid down. She saw the forest felled on every side, and in its place highly cultivated and productive farms brought into existence; roads opened through the wilds; bridges built over the numerous streams; school houses erected; and fine residences, substantial business blocks, and costly and elegant church edifices grow up to mark the spot where the little colony made the first opening for civilization, and in whose future were centered the hopes and aspirations of their lives.

She had well and faithfully performed her duties as wife and mother; she had commanded the respect of all who knew her; she was beloved and honored by her own family; she had lived her four score years, and weary of pains she had endured, weak through suffering and age, death was a welcome visitor. She has gone to a long and eternal rest, and her memory is embalmed in the hearts of those she loved.

 


Smith Thompson DEXTER

submitted by Andrew MacLaney  

Surname: Dexter

The Ionia Sentinel
Friday, July 12, 1878

IN MEMORIAM.

SMITH THOMPSON DEXTER.

It becomes our painful task to note the death of another of the Dexter family, a name familiar to old residents of this country as among its earliest pioneers.

Smith Thompson Dexter, the last remaining son of his father's family, departed this life on the evening of June 22nd, ult., after an illness of about three weeks, although his health had not been good for sometime previous to his being confined to his bed.

He has long been known as a quiet, unassuming man of steady habits, upright among men, and honoring God in his profession and daily walk. He bore his sufferings with great patience and resignation, expressed perfect readiness to to in peace whenever the Master should call, although he would have desired to live for his wife and only surviving child, Bennie. He gave Bennie much excellent advice and parting counsel, and seemed very grateful for every attention bestowed upon him by his faithful companion, referring often to the sad death of their elder son, Marshall, in California, six years ago, among strangers. A few minutes before he died he said: "Praise the Lord," and breathed his last without a groan or struggle.

The funeral, in charge of Mr. Allured, at Mr. Dexter's especial request, was held at his late residence, Rev. Mr. Pierson preaching very acceptably from the same text used at Marshall's funeral services in California.

"But none of these things move me, neither count I my life dear unto myself."--Acts, XX, 24.

The music, excellent and appropriate, was by Mr. Emory Strong and his sisters.

Mr. S. T. Dexter was a cousin of Mrs. Alonzo Sessions and of Mr. John C. Dexter, whose father, Samuel Dexter, it will be remembered was one of the first to move his family to Ionia county.

The subject of our sketch was fifty-four years of age; his father, mother, sisters and three brothers are buried in Ionia cemetery, one brother in California, one in Missouri, one in New York, and one, the youngest, "a brave soldier and a true patriot," in Waterford, Virginia.

Not all are the graves in the moonlight cold,
Not all are the marbles in sunlight fair--
They point to the city with streets of gold,
They number our treasures just over there.

It matters but little that earth is wide,
And far that apart in her comely breast
The caskets which once our jewels did hide
For ages from our sight have been laid at rest.

For heaven and earth, that are near akin,
Lie side by side in the realm of space,
And the way is short and the veil is thin
That keeps us back from the Holy Place.

And a golden frame-work is o'er us all
Who sit and watch at the outer gate,
And who, where the heavenly glories fall,
For our steps at the inner temple wait.

It will not be long, it will not be long,
Till the ark be lifted to lead the way
From the land of sighs to the land of song,
From the midnight watch to the cloudless day.

Grace Glenn

 

 

Last update December 06, 2012